photographsonthebrain

burnedshoes:

PHOTOBOOK: RENÉ BURRI - IMPOSSIBLE REMINISCENCES

From Burri’s iconic shot of Che Guevara smoking a cigar, to his beautifully composed photographs of the construction of Brasilia, his black-and-white photography is ingrained in the collective consciousness.

Previously less-known are his colour photographs that he has continually taken alongside his black-and-white work. This book introduces a retrospective of his personal selection of colour photographs. (read more)

MAY HIS SOUL REST IN PEACE

Magnum photographer René Burri has died aged 81. Burri — who began working with Magnum as an associate in 1955 before becoming a full member in 1959.

“Not only was he one of the great post war photographers, he was also one of the most generous people I have had the privilege to meet,” Martin Parr, President of Magnum Photos said in a statement. “[His] contribution to Magnum and his unrivalled ability to tell stories and entertain us over this time will be part of his enormous legacy. Our thoughts and best wishes go out to his family.”

“With René Burri, the world of photography loses one of its most powerful artists, a true humanist, who skillfully documented from behind-the-scenes the suffering and joy of human kind,” said Burri’s family. (read more)

» more photos by René Burri «  |  » more of Magnum Photos «  |   » more photobooks «

bobbycaputo

bobbycaputo:

'Shoppers' Captures the Diverse Characters Found in a Bristol Mall

For Shoppers, London-based photographer Matthew Murray constructed a temporary studio within Bristol’s Galleries Shopping Mall, inviting its most intriguing characters to sit for brief portrait sessions. Murray is drawn to the nuances of consumerism, and for each of his subjects, he requested a brief explanation for their trip to the mall, uncovering moments of unexpected variety within a setting of the everyday.

(Continue Reading)

bobbycaputo

bobbycaputo:

For a New Generation of Queer Youth, the Closet Is No Longer Mandatory

Growing up in Colorado in the 1980s, being out of the closet was, for M. Sharkey, “just not a possibility.” “I couldn’t even imagine not being in the closet. I couldn’t imagine being open about my sexuality,” he said.

Times have changed, and as LGBTQ Americans have won greater freedoms and protections under the law, a new generation of kids has increasingly begun to experience something novel: A childhood in which sexuality and gender identity is more freely expressed and discussed.

(Continue Reading)

dynamicafrica

dynamicafrica:

Portraits taken by South African photographer Thabiso Sekgala.

Based on the, system of homelands (from which the series takes its name) created by the apartheid government, Homeland is what Sekgala describes as a “culmination of an exploration of memory, place and interrelated self-imaging”.

Intrigued by the feeling of ‘belonging’ linked to these geographic areas constructed by the apartheid government, Sekgala photographed peripheral communities - especially youth, in the former KwaNdebele and Bophuthatswan homelands to visually document the fading and abandonment of these landscapes.

With the creation of a new South Africa, both geographically and socially speaking, homelands no longer have the same relevance they did during apartheid. As people begin permanently migrating away from these areas, issues arise that explore the marginal integration of these societies into a larger national culture.

As part of a post-Apartheid photography generation, Sekgala is interested in making connections to his own past, memory and questions of belonging.

bobbycaputo

bobbycaputo:

Captivating Portraits of Drifters That Migrate to the Beaches of San Diego in Winter

For California Winter, Los Angeles-based photographer John Francis Peters enters the ephemeral community of drifters flocking to sunny San Diego in winter, documenting the temporary homes they erect along the oceanfront parks. Throughout the cold, snowy months from November to March, the waves beckon to carloads of spiritual travelers, runaway kids, and enduring nomads, all of whom have shed the confines of a traditional home life for the freedom of the open road.

(Continue Reading)

budapestposter
budapestposter:

Macskássy Gyula (balra) grafikus és rajzfilmrendező, a magyar rajzfilm „atyja”. Rajzfilmjeit a Walt Disney mesék inspirálták, de egyedi stílust dolgozott ki, melyre a karikatúra, az absztrakt festészet és a népi motívumok is hatással voltak. 1971-ben, nem sokkal halála előtt ő indította útjára a híres rajzfilmsorozatot, a Frakk, a macskák rémét.

Gyula Macskássy (on the left) was a graphic artist and a cartoon director. His films were influenced by the work of Walt Disney, but he soon developed a typical Hungarian, unique style. Caricature, abstract painting and folk art also had an impact on his works. In 1971, shortly before his death he started the famous Hungarian animation TV series, the ’Tails, the terror of cats’.
(a kép forrása | the source of the photo: filmkultura.hu - Gyula Macskássy with György Várnai)

budapestposter:

Macskássy Gyula (balra) grafikus és rajzfilmrendező, a magyar rajzfilm „atyja”. Rajzfilmjeit a Walt Disney mesék inspirálták, de egyedi stílust dolgozott ki, melyre a karikatúra, az absztrakt festészet és a népi motívumok is hatással voltak. 1971-ben, nem sokkal halála előtt ő indította útjára a híres rajzfilmsorozatot, a Frakk, a macskák rémét.

Gyula Macskássy (on the left) was a graphic artist and a cartoon director. His films were influenced by the work of Walt Disney, but he soon developed a typical Hungarian, unique style. Caricature, abstract painting and folk art also had an impact on his works. In 1971, shortly before his death he started the famous Hungarian animation TV series, the ’Tails, the terror of cats’.

(a kép forrása | the source of the photo: filmkultura.hu - Gyula Macskássy with György Várnai)